Why You Should Consider Ridin’ Solo In Your Early 20’s

ridinsolo

Disclaimer: The stories on this blog are relatable, but you might not be able to relate.

Suggestion: Either Youtube in another tab, or imagine listening to “Ridin’ Solo” by Jason DeRulo while reading this.

This post is by: Sarah Bolton

My manager at the Irish Pub I work at often asks me, “What have you got, Bolty?” when I stand at the well waiting for my drinks to be made. Sometimes I tell him which drinks I need. But more often I say, “Tommy, I’ve got my whole life ahead of me,” and we both chuckle. I’m 24, and I love being a “grown up.” I can go to bed at whatever time I want, I can eat ice cream for breakfast if I want, I can watch whatever movies I want, and I can stay out partying until 6 a.m. if I want. It’s f@hCk1ñG amazing. Yes, there are the responsibilities of being an adult like paying rent, paying your own car insurance and getting your own cell phone plan. But not a day goes by that I wish I were a kid again.

Although adulthood requires some added responsibilities, it also brings with it a huge sense of freedom. Knowing that I am in control of my life is exhilarating. When I moved to Vegas 13 months ago, a lot of my friends and family told me how “lucky” I was. “I would never be able to move somewhere new at the drop of a hat like you did,” they would say. I noticed that their “reasons” for not being able to do exciting, fun stuff always involved their boyfriend, their husband, or their children. I began to notice this disturbing phenomenon occurring more and more frequently the more I looked around. Why people would choose to settle down “prematurely” is still somewhat of a mystery to me. But as a writer with a hint of economist, philosopher, and psychologist, these mysteries are what keep life interesting.

I’ve recently discovered that many females have dreams about their wedding day. I too, actually have recurring dreams about my wedding day, except that my dreams are nightmares that I wake up from, in a sweaty panic. In my dreams, I am walking down the aisle to be married, and I realize the man I’m supposed to marry is just mediocre. Then one of two things always happens: 1. I get up to the front to begin the exchanging of vows and I FAINT, or 2. I run away before I even make it down the aisle.

Some might say I have “commitment issues”, but I disagree. I have a lot of friends that I have known for a long time (one of my best friends I’ve known for 13 years!), and we plan on being best friends for the rest of our lives. So it’s not the spending a lot of time with one person that frightens me. I just think I am not ready to give up on my own dreams to make compromises for someone else. Call me selfish, but I think in this case, being selfish is a good thing. Here’s why: If you are not happy with yourself, and you haven’t had the opportunity to fulfill your dreams, then getting in a relationship, marriage, or having children will only accentuate that unhappiness and dissatisfaction you have in your life. Locking it up is not going to fill that hole in your heart. Besides, your twenties are your years to experience new things! You are out on your own, and it’s a time to figure out who you are as a person, without the constant feedback from parents or anyone else. If you realize that you’ve got your whole life ahead of you, what’s the rush of settling down?

Since the start of the New Year, I have begun to seriously focus on my Anti-Aging Business. My new mentor, “The U.S. Memory Champion”, has been giving me weekly assignments to do. This has kept me on track and challenged me to do things I wouldn’t normally do on my own. The progress I have made in just a few months demonstrates that even at 24, I’m only at the tip of the iceberg in regards to my personal growth. (Our brains aren’t fully developed until the age of 25, after all.)  But just like a dead-end job, getting married or having kids too young can be stagnating to your ability to grow as a person. Your priorities shift, and it becomes increasingly difficult to set aside time for yourself.

Yes, there are exceptions, and every situation is different. I am well aware there are many people who got together when they were young, got married, had kids, and can attest to their personal happiness and fulfillment. But I also know of many more people who got into relationships for the wrong reasons and later regretted it. These are people who wasted years of their lives because they were afraid of being alone. I may decide some day that I want to get married and have children, but when that time comes I know for d@mñ sure I will be ready to give my husband and children the gift of myself, without any regrets. So if you’re young and single, EMBRACE IT! You’re “lucky.” Get out there, and do the things you’ve always wanted to do because it might be your only chance. “You are now free to move about the country.” -Southwest Airlines

I loved hearing Sarah’s perspective on enjoying the single life. In the words of Jason DeRulo, “Told me get my shit together, Now I got my shit together, yeah”

-M

Sarah Bolton, a Las Vegas resident, is originally from Orange County, California. She attended San Diego State University, where she received her Bachelor’s degree in Journalism, with an emphasis in Advertising. She has been concerned with health and nutrition since she was in high school. Bolton, 24, recognizes the importance of social responsibility and believes in preserving our planet through environmentally sustainable practices. In 2010, she was introduced to non-surgical, anti-aging products that help to maintain optimal health from the inside-out and has since developed a passion for teaching others ways to improve their lives through natural products and a healthy lifestyle. You can check out her website at http://www.TheAntioxidantQueen.com

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2 thoughts on “Why You Should Consider Ridin’ Solo In Your Early 20’s

  1. I loved this!!!!

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